Writing an Offer to Purchase Real Estate

Writing an Offer to Purchase Real Estate

Once you find the home you want to buy, the next step is to write an offer – which is not as easy as it sounds.  Your offer is the first step toward negotiating a sales contract with the seller.  Since this is just the beginning of negotiations, you should put yourself in the seller’s shoes and imagine his or her reaction to everything you include.  Your goal is to get what you want, and imagining the seller’s reactions will help you attain that goal.

The offer is much more complicated than simply coming up with a price and saying, “This is what I’ll pay.”  Because of the large dollar amounts involved, especially in today’s litigious society, both you and the seller want to build in protections and contingencies to protect your investment and limit your risk.

In an offer to purchase real estate, you include not only the price you are willing to pay, but other details of the purchase as well.  This includes how you intend to finance the home, your down payment, who pays what closing costs, what inspections are performed, timetables, whether personal property is included in the purchase, terms of cancellation, any repairs you want performed, which professional services will be used, when you get physical possession of the property, and how to settle disputes should they occur.

It is certainly more involved than buying a car. And more important.

Buying a home is a major event for both the buyer and seller.  It will affect your finances more than any other previous purchase or investment.  The seller makes plans based on your offer that affect his finances, too.  However, it is more important than just money.  In the half-hour it takes to write an offer you are making decisions that affect how you live for the next several years, if not the rest of your life.  The seller is going to review your offer carefully, because it also affects how he or she lives the rest of their life.

That sounds dramatic.  It sounds like a cliché.  Every real estate book or article you read says the same thing.  And they all say it because it is true.

Contingencies in a Purchase Offer

In most purchase transactions there may be a slight challenge or two, but most things will go quite smoothly.  However, you want to anticipate potential problems so that if something does go wrong, you can cancel the contract without penalty.  These are called “contingencies” and you must be sure to include them when you offer to buy a home.

For example, some “move-up” buyers often agree to purchase a home before selling their previous home.  Even if the home is already sold, it is probably a “pending sale” and has not closed.  Therefore, you should make closing your own sale a condition of your offer.  If you do not include this as a contingency, you may find yourself making two mortgage payments instead of one.

There are other common contingencies you should include in your offer.  Since you probably need a mortgage to buy the home, a condition of your offer should be that you successfully obtain suitable financing.  During the escrow period you are likely to require certain inspections, and another contingency should be that it pass those inspections.

Basically, contingencies protect you in case you cannot perform or choose not to perform on a promise to buy a home.  If you cancel a contract without having built-in conditions and contingencies, you could find yourself forfeiting your earnest money deposit.  Or worse.

Earnest Money Deposit

After you have come up with an offer price, the next step is to determine how large a deposit you want to make with your offer.  You want the “earnest money deposit” to be large enough to show the seller you are serious, but not so large you are placing significant funds at risk.  The Earnest Money Deposit amount is usually determined by the Seller and will be listed on the MLS print-out.

As with practically everything in real estate, there are exceptions to this rule.  During a hot market there may be multiple offers on the property that interests you.  A large deposit may impress a seller enough so they will accept your offer instead of someone else’s, even when your unknown competitor is offering the same price or slightly higher.

Since large deposits do impress sellers, you may also find that by making a large deposit you can convince the seller to accept a lower offer.  More money up front may save you money later.

The Closing Date

It is absolutely essential that you include a closing date as part of your offer.  This way both you and the seller can make plans for moving, and the seller can make plans for buying his or her next home.  Though most transactions actually do close on the right date, do not be so inflexible that a delay creates insurmountable problems.

For example, if you are renting and need to give the landlord notice that you are moving out, you may want to allow a little flexibility.  Otherwise, if your purchase closes a few days late you could find yourself staying in a motel with your belongings packed in a moving van somewhere while you pay storage costs.

There are also times when closing can be delayed by weeks, through no fault of your own.  Have back-up plans prepared for such a contingency.

Transfer of Possession

A transaction is considered “closed” once the deeds have been recorded.  Then you own the home.  You will normally be able to move into your new home immediately.

However, in rare occasions, it is not always possible for you to occupy it immediately.  This can happen for several reasons, but the most common is that the seller may be purchasing a home, too.  Usually, it is scheduled to close simultaneously with your purchase of their home.

It is sort of like being at a red light when it turns green.  Although all the cars see the light change at the same time, the guy at the back of the line doesn’t begin moving until all the cars ahead of him have started.

As a result, it has become customary to allow the seller up to a maximum of three days to turn over actual possession and keys to the home.  When transfer of possession actually occurs should be clearly laid out in your offer to prevent confusion later.

Disclosures From the Seller

Although you have toured the property, looked at the walls and ceiling, turned on the faucets and played with the light switches, you have not lived in it.  The seller has years of knowledge about his or her home and there may be some things you want to find out about as quickly as possible.  For this reason, you will require certain disclosures as part of your offer.

Basically, you want the seller to disclose any adverse conditions that may have a substantial impact on your decision to purchase the home.  This would include any problems with the house, whether the property is in a flood zone, a noise zone, or any other kind of hazardous area.

If you have an agent representing you, this is almost automatic, but many states do not require individuals selling their own home to provide you with this information.  Often they do not require banks selling foreclosed property to provide these disclosures, either.  Obtaining these types of disclosures should always be a part of your offer, and time is of the essence.

Condition of the Property

The last thing you want when you assume possession of your new home is to find it in a total mess.  Therefore, you should make it clear in your offer that certain minimum standards are required.  If you do not, you might find out the seller or neighbors have begun using the back yard as a trash dump, or something worse – and you would not be able to do anything about it.

Some of the requirements you might want to include in your offer are that the roof does not leak, the appliances work, the plumbing does not leak, that there are no broken or cracked windows, the yard has been kept up, and any debris has been cleared away.

Inspections You Should Require

Besides appraisal and the termite inspection, you should also have a professional go through the house and seek out potential problems.  Of course, you will have inspected the home, but you are not used to looking at some things that a professional will find.  Even if they are not things the seller is expected to repair, at least you will have foreknowledge of any potential problems.

The seller will want this inspection performed quickly, so that you can approve the results and move forward with the purchase.  Once you receive the inspection, you will want to allow yourself sufficient time to review and approve the report.  If you do not approve the report, you may negotiate with the sellers on which repairs should be performed and who should pay for those repairs.  Otherwise, you can cancel the purchase without penalty, provided you have included timetables in your offer.

As part of your offer, you may require a termite and pest inspection.  This company not only inspects for termite damage and pest infestations, but also inspects for dry rot and water damage, among other things.  The company that performs the inspection is important to you as a buyer, because you want to be sure they do a good job.  It is important to the seller because it is customary that they pay for the inspection and some types of repairs that may be required.

You should determine which company you want to perform this inspection and make it a part of your offer.  Otherwise the seller will choose. If you do not know which company to hire, your agent will make a recommendation.

 

Final Walk-Through Inspection

Before closing, you will want to revisit the property to ensure it is in the condition you have required in your offer, and to inspect that any required repairs have been performed.  You should do this at least by the day before closing.